Essays on refugee blues

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Many of Auden's poems during the 1930s and after were inspired by unconsummated love, and in the 1950s he summarised his emotional life in a famous couplet: "If equal affection cannot be / Let the more loving one be me" ("The More Loving One"). He had a gift for friendship and, starting in the late 1930s, a strong wish for the stability of marriage; in a letter to his friend James Stern he called marriage "the only subject." [29] Throughout his life, Auden performed charitable acts, sometimes in public (as in his 1935 marriage of convenience to Erika Mann that provided her with a British passport to escape the Nazis), [9] but, especially in later years, more often in private. He was embarrassed if they were publicly revealed, as when his gift to his friend Dorothy Day for the Catholic Worker movement was reported on the front page of The New York Times in 1956. [30]

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 · Check out our top Free Essays on Refugee Blues to help you write your own Essay

The Mood in Funeral Blues by . Auden


The poem, "Funeral Blues", by . Auden tells about a
person's grief and is successful in creating a very sad and depressing
mood. This is achieved by the poet's use of language, word choice and
sentence structure. The way in which the author describes his feeling
- along with the use of rhythm and rhyme - was created in a very
effective way which made it clear to the reader.

In the first stanza the depressing mood is created straight away by
the poet's use of commands, which created the impression that he
wanted the whole world to come to a stand still:

"Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,

Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone"

These particular commands are demanding silence from everyone as he is
requesting silence from everyone as he wants the clocks to stop
ticking, the phone to stop ringing, the dog to be quiet and basically
every aspect of normal, everyday life to come to a halt. By doing this
the author has made it obvious that the person he has lost was his
whole world and he feels as if the world cannot go on anymore without
this person.

Auden also made effective use of rhythm and rhyme in order to
create the atmosphere, which exists at a funeral:

"…with muffled drum,

Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come."

By the use of the word 'muffled' I was given the impression of a
foggy, depressing and cold day with the coffin being removed from the
black hearse. I thought it to be effective when 'drum' was mentioned
as normally it is at state funerals for very important people where
drums are used. The impression I received was that it...


... middle of paper ...


...der to swallow pills. This is then continued as the next line
is telling of the complete despair that he feels and shows the lack of
hope and happiness he possesses:

"For nothing now can ever come to any good."

The use of the word nothing also shows he does not see a future for
himself anymore. As it is a short sentence and if you follow the
rhythm intended it is a drowsy beat which again extends the overdose
idea as it is him falling asleep and puts him out of his misery but at
the same time the ending remains sad and does not give a happy ending.

In conclusion, Funeral Blues by Auden was successful in creating a
very depressing mood that was full of despair and contained absolutely
no hope. This was effective by the use of simple language, sentence
structure and most importantly the use of rhythm and rhyme.
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essays on refugee blues

Essays on refugee blues

Many of Auden's poems during the 1930s and after were inspired by unconsummated love, and in the 1950s he summarised his emotional life in a famous couplet: "If equal affection cannot be / Let the more loving one be me" ("The More Loving One"). He had a gift for friendship and, starting in the late 1930s, a strong wish for the stability of marriage; in a letter to his friend James Stern he called marriage "the only subject." [29] Throughout his life, Auden performed charitable acts, sometimes in public (as in his 1935 marriage of convenience to Erika Mann that provided her with a British passport to escape the Nazis), [9] but, especially in later years, more often in private. He was embarrassed if they were publicly revealed, as when his gift to his friend Dorothy Day for the Catholic Worker movement was reported on the front page of The New York Times in 1956. [30]

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essays on refugee blues

Essays on refugee blues

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essays on refugee blues

Essays on refugee blues

The law prohibits discrimination by businesses and governments against people who have disabilities.

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essays on refugee blues
Essays on refugee blues

Many of Auden's poems during the 1930s and after were inspired by unconsummated love, and in the 1950s he summarised his emotional life in a famous couplet: "If equal affection cannot be / Let the more loving one be me" ("The More Loving One"). He had a gift for friendship and, starting in the late 1930s, a strong wish for the stability of marriage; in a letter to his friend James Stern he called marriage "the only subject." [29] Throughout his life, Auden performed charitable acts, sometimes in public (as in his 1935 marriage of convenience to Erika Mann that provided her with a British passport to escape the Nazis), [9] but, especially in later years, more often in private. He was embarrassed if they were publicly revealed, as when his gift to his friend Dorothy Day for the Catholic Worker movement was reported on the front page of The New York Times in 1956. [30]

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Essays on refugee blues

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essays on refugee blues

Essays on refugee blues

Home | Company Profile | Segmentation Industries | Segmentation Partners | Rental | Support | Partners | Case Studies | Events | Latest | Contact Us |

Action Action

essays on refugee blues

Essays on refugee blues

The law prohibits discrimination by businesses and governments against people who have disabilities.

Action Action

essays on refugee blues

Essays on refugee blues

The Mood in Funeral Blues by . Auden


The poem, "Funeral Blues", by . Auden tells about a
person's grief and is successful in creating a very sad and depressing
mood. This is achieved by the poet's use of language, word choice and
sentence structure. The way in which the author describes his feeling
- along with the use of rhythm and rhyme - was created in a very
effective way which made it clear to the reader.

In the first stanza the depressing mood is created straight away by
the poet's use of commands, which created the impression that he
wanted the whole world to come to a stand still:

"Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,

Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone"

These particular commands are demanding silence from everyone as he is
requesting silence from everyone as he wants the clocks to stop
ticking, the phone to stop ringing, the dog to be quiet and basically
every aspect of normal, everyday life to come to a halt. By doing this
the author has made it obvious that the person he has lost was his
whole world and he feels as if the world cannot go on anymore without
this person.

Auden also made effective use of rhythm and rhyme in order to
create the atmosphere, which exists at a funeral:

"…with muffled drum,

Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come."

By the use of the word 'muffled' I was given the impression of a
foggy, depressing and cold day with the coffin being removed from the
black hearse. I thought it to be effective when 'drum' was mentioned
as normally it is at state funerals for very important people where
drums are used. The impression I received was that it...


... middle of paper ...


...der to swallow pills. This is then continued as the next line
is telling of the complete despair that he feels and shows the lack of
hope and happiness he possesses:

"For nothing now can ever come to any good."

The use of the word nothing also shows he does not see a future for
himself anymore. As it is a short sentence and if you follow the
rhythm intended it is a drowsy beat which again extends the overdose
idea as it is him falling asleep and puts him out of his misery but at
the same time the ending remains sad and does not give a happy ending.

In conclusion, Funeral Blues by Auden was successful in creating a
very depressing mood that was full of despair and contained absolutely
no hope. This was effective by the use of simple language, sentence
structure and most importantly the use of rhythm and rhyme.
Read Full Essay Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

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Essays on refugee blues

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